Last edited by Yozshubar
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

4 edition of Restrictive business practices, transnational corporations and development found in the catalog.

Restrictive business practices, transnational corporations and development

Frank Long

Restrictive business practices, transnational corporations and development

a survey

by Frank Long

  • 384 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by M. Nijhoff Pub., distributors for North America, Klewer Boston in Boston, Hingham, Mass .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Developing countries.
    • Subjects:
    • International business enterprises.,
    • Restraint of trade.,
    • Industrial concentration.,
    • International business enterprises -- Developing countries.,
    • Economic development.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

      StatementFrank Long.
      SeriesDimensions of international business
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD2755.5 .L66
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxv, 166 p. :
      Number of Pages166
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4109735M
      ISBN 10089838057X
      LC Control Number80024652

      A Transnational Approach to Restrictive Business Practices Introduction transnational economy. More recent literature has concentrated more on equipment, the development on more suitable lines of a new plant, and a more rational grouping of undertakings, and, on the other hand, act as a check on uneconomic competition. Restrictive business practices adversely affecting international trade, particularly that of developing countries, should be eliminated and efforts should be made at the national and international levels with the objective of negotiating a set of equitable principles and rules.

      What are the challenges to the prevention of transnational bribery by multinational corporations in international business transactions? This book examines two particular constraints operating on the regulation of transnational corruption in general and bribery in particular. Transnational corporations. Initially, international companies were established in the agricultural and extractive industries, but at the turn of the 21st century. most of them functioned in the secondary and tertiary sectors of the world economy. Currently, the bulk of international business .

      To ensure that the specific forms of restrictive business practices applied by transnational corporations do not impede the implementation of national sovereignty over natural re- sources, the fulfilment of national programmes of economic and social development, or ex-. legal, social and cultural impacts of transnational corporations in an increasingly global economy and the policy implications that arise therefrom. It focuses especially on political and economic issues related to transnational corporations. In addition, Transnational Corporations features book reviews. The journal welcomes contributions from.


Share this book
You might also like
Sea anglers fishes of Australia

Sea anglers fishes of Australia

Citizenship Today: Government and the Constitution (Creating America: A History of the United States)

Citizenship Today: Government and the Constitution (Creating America: A History of the United States)

Songs for the Recorder

Songs for the Recorder

General Services Administration

General Services Administration

Sunshine signposts.

Sunshine signposts.

Comparative management and economic progress

Comparative management and economic progress

What and how to play for pictures

What and how to play for pictures

Benjamin R. Buffington.

Benjamin R. Buffington.

Dog Soldiers

Dog Soldiers

Yearbook & register of members.

Yearbook & register of members.

Merchantsof menace

Merchantsof menace

Coventry

Coventry

Restrictive business practices, transnational corporations and development by Frank Long Download PDF EPUB FB2

Restrictive Business Practices, Transnational Corporations, and Development A Survey. Authors: Long, F. Free Preview. Restrictive business xiii xiv INTRODUCTION practices are not confined to developing countries; however, limited work seems to have been conducted in terms of relating the concept of restrictive business practices to problems of development.

The existing evidence of restrictive business practices in the development process is quite fragmen­ tary. One of the principal characteristics of restrictive business practices of transnational corporations as they affect developing countries is the absence of effective legislative control.

This chapter examines legislation in selected developed countries, accounting for most of the activities of transnational corporations in developing : Frank Long. Get this from a library. Restrictive business practices, transnational corporations and development: a survey.

[Frank Long]. Restrictive Business Practices, Transnational Corporations, and Development: a Survey. [Frank Long] -- Problems of development in what is normally called the Third World have been a subject matter of Restrictive business practices of the social sciences, lespecially of eco­ nomics, for over two decades now.

Restrictive business practices in international services industries: examples from Latin America. Jack M. Mintz and Thomas Tsiopoulos Taxation of foreign capital in the Mediterranean region. RESEARCH NOTES Steven Globerman Transnational corporations and international technological specialization.

Alan M. Rugman Towards and investment agenda for APEC. One convenient way of dealing with the study of restrictive business practices and development is to consider the world economy in a two-sectoral sense. Assume, for instance, that there is a restrictive business practices intensive sector that is broadly called developing : Frank Long.

Inthe value added of the top ten transnational corporations was in excess of U.S. $3 billion, which was more than the gross domestic product of eighty developing countries.

1 At the same time, the value added of transnational corporations as a group was estimated at U.S. $ billion, or 20 percent of the world’s national product, if Author: Frank Long. This book brings together papers written by representatives from UN agencies and academics who take a fresh look at the expanding role of transnational corporations and foreign direct investment in the world economy.

These papers deal with such issues as the nature and extent of globalisation, the shifting relations between transnational corporations and national economies, and the.

bnly formal participants in the development of these standards have been nation-state representatives. In the International Labor Organi-zation (ILO)-the exception to the rule-business and labor represent-atives serve on national delegations and have the right to speak and by: Abstract.

So far, we have looked at restrictive business practices within the context of the competitive process of international firms. This study would be incomplete without some reference to the ongoing work on the international aspects of controlling the restrictive business practices of : Frank Long.

Transnational Corporations Vol Number 3, December Contents ARTICLES Editorial Preface: Article Stream in Honour of Sanjaya Lall vii John H. Dunning Foreign direct investment and the 1 and Feng Zhang locational competitiveness of countries Dieter Ernst Asia’s “upgrading through innovation” 31 strategies and global innovationFile Size: 2MB.

Trade and Development Report Transnational Corporations VolNumber 1. 30 April United Nations Set of Multilaterally Agreed Equitable Principles and Rules for the Control of Restrictive Business Practices, Model Law on Competition, United.

This volume offers a wide-reaching exploration of foreign direct investment and developmental impacts through case studies from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Central Europe, also examining the role of 'new players' such as Chinese, Indian and South African TNCs.

The transnational corporation (TNC) as we know it today has developed mainly since education, business practices, culture and theories and effects relating to transnational corporations Author: Grazia Ietto-Gillies.

Transnational Corporations and Uneven Development (RLE International Business): The Internationalization of Capital and the Third World [Jenkins, Rhys] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Transnational Corporations and Uneven Development (RLE International Business): The Internationalization of Capital and the Third WorldCited by: Consequences of restrictive business practices of transnational enterprises Nature: Although restrictive business practices attributed to transnational enterprises may not differ in form from those operated by purely national firms, their international character means that their impact on trade and competition is more significant.

Anthony Fung's case study of the transnational media corporations in China offers fascinating details on how this tension is, in practice, as productive as it is disruptive. In that sense, the `Chinese experience' should be useful, or rather, necessary for further deliberations on issues of globalization, culture industry and political economy.

Corporations and Citizenship serves as a corrective by employing the concept of citizenship in order to make sense of the political dimensions of corporations.

Citizenship offers a way of thinking about roles and responsibilities among members of polities and between these Author: Andrew Crane, Dirk Matten, Jeremy Moon. Peoples’ Forum requests binding instrument to regulate Transnational Corporations (Novem ) A joint statement was drafted by participants of the first annual People's Forum on Human Rights and Businesses calling for an international legally binding instrument on human rights, transnational corporations and other business enterprises.

Guilhem Fabre, in The Globalization of Chinese Business, TNCs and R&D. Transnational corporations are key players since they account for about half of global R&D and at least two thirds of business R&D expenditures (estimated at US $ billion in ).

R&D spending of some large TNCs is higher than that of many countries, as six of them.Transnational corporations have spread their operations around the entire world and are frequently violating the most basic human rights.

This paper will discuss the negative impact of transnational corporations (hereinafter: TNCs) on the natural environment in host countries. It will focus on corporations operating in developing countries.Get this from a library! Restrictive business practices of multinational enterprises.

[Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Committee of Experts on Restrictive Business Practices.] -- This report is based on competition enforcement experience provided by 19 OECD Member countries and by the Commission of the European Communities, and focuses on issues of competition policy.